What Is A Free Trade Agreement Explain With Examples

In general, trade diversion means that a free trade agreement would divert trade from more efficient suppliers outside the zone to less efficient suppliers within the territories. Whereas the creation of trade implies the creation of a free trade area that might not otherwise have existed. In any case, the creation of trade will increase a country`s national well-being. [15] However, these advantages must be offset by a disadvantage: by excluding some countries, these agreements can transfer the composition of trade from low-cost countries that do not end up in high-cost countries. The United States has another multilateral regional trade agreement: the Dominican Republic-Central America Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA-DR). This agreement with Costa Rica, the Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua eliminated tariffs on more than 80% of U.S. non-textile exports. Governments with free trade policies or agreements do not necessarily abandon control over imports and exports or eliminate all protectionist measures. In modern international trade, few free trade agreements lead to completely free trade. Both the creation of trade and the diversion of trade have a decisive impact on the establishment of a free trade agreement.

The creation of trade will result in a shift in consumption from a cost producer to a low-cost producer, which will lead to an expansion of trade. On the other hand, trade diversion will mean that trade will move from a low-cost producer outside the zone to a more expensive producer in the free trade agreement. [16] Such offshoring will not benefit consumers under the free trade agreement, which will be deprived of the opportunity to purchase cheaper imported goods. However, economists note that trade diversion does not always harm the overall national well-being: it can even improve national well-being as a whole if the volume of misappropriated trade is low. [17] The General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT 1994) originally defined free trade agreements that were to include only trade in goods. [5] An agreement with a similar purpose, namely the improvement of trade in services, is referred to as the “economic integration agreement” in Article V of the General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS). [6] However, in practice, the term is now commonly used [by whom?] to refer to agreements that concern not only goods, but also services and even investments.