Voluntary Discussion Agreement

In 23 countries, the regulatory framework provided for a review of PRT prices. In Denmark and Ireland, revisions have also taken place at regular intervals, but they are based on a voluntary agreement between public payers and the pharmaceutical industry instead of legislation. Countries with revision or monitoring legislation had either fixed dates or fixed intervals between one month and five years. Of the 26 countries that followed prices and corrected prices, 18 did this exercise regularly, with the remainder on some occasions. The duration of the intervals ranged from 3 months to 5 years. In some cases, regular price controls or revisions are linked to certain medicines: in Norway, the prices of 250 substances representing about three quarters of the value market have been revised each year and, in Spain and Ireland, prices of non-patented medicines have been regularly updated once a year. Five countries (Belgium, Croatia, Denmark, Germany and Hungary) indicated that they did not have regular intervals for price changes. The competent authorities of two countries (Germany and Hungary) have not reviewed and monitored drug prices at all. Despite the existence of the law in Hungary, the details regulation has not yet been implemented at the time of the investigation. Voluntary agreement between countries, institutes and individuals on what a product or process is, what it should be and what it should do or what it should do is important. To this end, standards are a key element of the unified European market. But of course, the idea of standardization can also be used within a multi-institutional group, because standardization facilitates communication between different participants or stakeholders who are working in a single process or carrying out a project (for example.

B Crime prevention). Standards thus facilitate cooperation and cooperation and make processes more transparent. Following a standard is something that people and organizations do on a purely voluntary basis: “Compliance is not mandatory.” Because of its carcinogenic potential and low exposure limits, acrylamide is considered a potential health hazard (JECFA, 2005).